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Three Strategies for Great Communication as a Business Leader

Originally published on worldhab.com

Communication is one of the most critical skills to have in order to be a successful leader. If you can convey your ideas clearly, you can facilitate excellent business practices within your organization.

Some people have a natural gift for articulating their thoughts and feelings with clarity. Others need to work hard to develop this skill. If you put in the work, business communication is something you can get better at with time.

Thay Humes is the leader behind Humes McCoy Aviation and a visionary in the field of air travel and transport. As a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, Mr. Humes is a certified helicopter pilot whose passion is flying. Thay Humes has professional values which are instilled from his military work ethic and ability to accomplish tasks with honor and integrity.

Here are three strategies from Mr. Humes that you can use for better communication:

As a leader, it is often tempting to speak your mind immediately. You are probably passionate and have strong opinions and the tendency to speak your mind.

Try to get your employees to speak first during most conversations. It is essential to understand the employee’s feelings, so you know what is going on in their head. Once you start talking, your ideas may dominate the conversation due to your status as the boss.

  1. Listen Before You Speak

As a leader, it is often tempting to speak your mind immediately. You are probably passionate and have strong opinions and the tendency to speak your mind.

Try to get your employees to speak first during most conversations. It is essential to understand the employee’s feelings, so you know what is going on in their head. Once you start talking, your ideas may dominate the conversation due to your status as the boss.

That is an effective way to approach your conversations at work. It’s all about getting clear information so that you can say and do whatever makes the most sense for the good of the business.

  1. Check in Frequently

Don’t wait for a disaster to happen; start communicating with your team now. Make a point of checking in with the key members of your organization on a regular and pre-planned basis. You could do weekly updates via email, for example.

By checking in, you will become informed of small issues before they become big ones. You may notice risks as well as issues that are looming on the horizon that you otherwise wouldn’t have been aware of. It allows you to be more proactive in resolving issues early on as well as preventing similar ones from arising.

Resist the urge to micromanage during this process. Use communication as a chance to get information and stay informed. That is the best way to keep up to date with what is happening in your organization.

  1. Use Multiple Forms of Communication

Different people communicate and learn in different ways. For some, writing and reading are the best ways to receive information. Others learn best through audio such as podcasts and voice messages, and some use visual cues to figure things out.

You should utilize all forms of communication in your business. Use speech and visuals to convey information to your team.

For example, you could use an email to send out new information to your team, and then follow it up with a quick one-minute video update. This would provide textual, verbal, and visual information. You should give all of these options to your team members so that they can communicate in whatever form works best for them.

Clarity and Great Business

 

As you learn to say what you think with greater clarity and confidence, there will be benefits that extend to every area of your business. You’ll feel better and be able to get more finished and accomplished.

 

Your team will notice the difference as well. By being clear with each other, you can avoid unnecessary arguments and maintain a positive emotional tone at work even through difficult times. Use the above tactics, and you will be well on your way to a productive culture of communication at work.

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